Origin of the word silver lining

Translations in context of "silver lining" in English-Arabic from Reverso Context: But like every silver lining, it only frames a cloud full of lightning that kills people. Short for every cloud has a silver lining. Meaning of Idiom Silver Lining: a positive outcome or aspect of a bad situation; an unseen benefit or element of.

Use the term silver lining when you want to emphasize the hopeful side of a situation that might seem gloomy on the surface. The common expression "every cloud  These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'silver lining.' Views expressed in the   This metaphoric term is a shortening of Every cloud has a silver lining, in turn derived from John Milton's Comus (1634): “A sable cloud turns forth its silver lining on  silver lining (n.) a "bright side" which proverbially accompanies even the darkest trouble; by 1843, apparently from oft-quoted lines from Milton's "Comus," where 

Definition of a silver lining in the Idioms Dictionary. a silver lining phrase. What does a silver lining expression mean? Definitions by the largest Idiom Dictionary.

"Every cloud has a silver lining" means that every difficulty or setback that the phrase comes from the fact that, every dark rain cloud has a silver edge, or lining. Silver lining definition: If you talk about a silver lining , you are talking about something or unhappy situation (esp in the phrase every cloud has a silver lining). Meaning | Synonyms. sadness or unpleasant things can have a positive side effect; each negative situation can be positive eventually; there may be an  Define EVERY CLOUD HAS A SILVER LINING (phrase) and get synonyms. What is EVERY CLOUD HAS A SILVER LINING (phrase)? EVERY CLOUD HAS A 

Meaning of silver lining with illustrations and photos. Pronunciation of silver lining and it's etymology. Related words - silver lining synonyms, antonyms, 

silver lining. noun [ C ] uk/ˌsɪl.və ˈlaɪ.nɪŋ/ us/ˌsɪl.vɚ ˈlaɪ.nɪŋ/. › an advantage that comes from a difficult or unpleasant situation: When things look black, there's always a silver lining. The injury had a silver lining: it enabled Blake to spend his father's last weeks with him. The phrase is 'every cloud has a silver lining'. This derives from John Milton's Comus of 1634 - a sable cloud turns forth its silver lining on the night. You are most likely to remind a sad or discouraged friend that there is a silver lining as a way of cheering him up. The origin of the phrase seems to be John Milton's 1634 poem "Comus," which includes the line, "Was I deceived? or did a sable cloud/Turn forth her silver lining on the night?" This is because the image of the silver lining of a cloud appears to have been created by the English poet John Milton (1608-74) in Comus. A Mask Presented at Ludlow-Castle, 1634 (sable means black, and silver lining denotes the light of the moon shining from behind the cloud): (ed. Cambridge University Press, 1906) silver lining unknown phrase used to tell someone that there is a brighter side to the problem they are facing. the phrase comes from the fact that, every dark rain cloud has a silver edge, or lining.

14 Nov 2017 You are most likely to remind a sad or discouraged friend that there is a silver lining as a way of cheering him up. The origin of the phrase 

An element of hope or a redeeming quality in an otherwise bad situation, as in The rally had a disappointing turnout, but the silver lining was that those who came pledged a great deal of money. This metaphoric term is a shortening of Every cloud has a silver lining , in turn derived from John Milton's Comus (1634): “A sable cloud turns forth its silver lining on the night.”

^ “every cloud has a silver lining” in Stuart Berg Flexner and Doris Flexner, Wise Words and Wives' Tales: The Origins, Meanings, and Time-Honored Wisdom of 

This is because the image of the silver lining of a cloud appears to have been created by the English poet John Milton (1608-74) in Comus. A Mask Presented at Ludlow-Castle, 1634 (sable means black, and silver lining denotes the light of the moon shining from behind the cloud): (ed. Cambridge University Press, 1906) silver lining unknown phrase used to tell someone that there is a brighter side to the problem they are facing. the phrase comes from the fact that, every dark rain cloud has a silver edge, or lining. The Origin Of ‘Every Cloud Has a Silver Lining’ The saying every cloud has a silver lining must have formed from people observing clouds in the sky. When clouds float in front of the sun, they will sometimes have a “silver lining” around them. John Milton coined the phrase 'silver lining' in Comus: A Mask Presented at Ludlow Castle, 1634 I see ye visibly, and now believe That he, the Supreme Good, to whom all things ill Are but as slavish officers of vengeance, Would send a glistering guardian,

And a silver lining in Dorian’s dark clouds: There is currently no risk tornadoes in the region due to the storm. — Jaclyn Reiss, BostonGlobe.com, "Maps: How Dorian could impact Massachusetts this weekend," 5 Sep. An element of hope or a redeeming quality in an otherwise bad situation, as in The rally had a disappointing turnout, but the silver lining was that those who came pledged a great deal of money. This metaphoric term is a shortening of Every cloud has a silver lining , in turn derived from John Milton's Comus (1634): “A sable cloud turns forth its silver lining on the night.” silver lining. noun [ C ] uk/ˌsɪl.və ˈlaɪ.nɪŋ/ us/ˌsɪl.vɚ ˈlaɪ.nɪŋ/. › an advantage that comes from a difficult or unpleasant situation: When things look black, there's always a silver lining. The injury had a silver lining: it enabled Blake to spend his father's last weeks with him. The phrase is 'every cloud has a silver lining'. This derives from John Milton's Comus of 1634 - a sable cloud turns forth its silver lining on the night. You are most likely to remind a sad or discouraged friend that there is a silver lining as a way of cheering him up. The origin of the phrase seems to be John Milton's 1634 poem "Comus," which includes the line, "Was I deceived? or did a sable cloud/Turn forth her silver lining on the night?" This is because the image of the silver lining of a cloud appears to have been created by the English poet John Milton (1608-74) in Comus. A Mask Presented at Ludlow-Castle, 1634 (sable means black, and silver lining denotes the light of the moon shining from behind the cloud): (ed. Cambridge University Press, 1906)